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Macarons

Macarons

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Introduction

If you’re like me, and I’m guessing you are if you’ve read this far, then you probably love macarons. There’s something about their complicated yet elegant appearance that makes them so appealing. And they’re not just pretty; they’re also delicious!

Macarons

  • 90 g almond meal
  • 175 g icing sugar
  • 80 g egg whites
  • 40 g caster sugar
  • Food colouring

Ingredients

The ingredients for macarons are simple: almond flour, confectioners’ sugar, egg whites and granulated sugar. The first step to making a perfect batch of macarons is to follow a recipe closely. There are no substitutes for the ingredients listed (except for a pinch of salt if you don’t have any). It’s also important to measure them out carefully by weight or volume; otherwise your cookies may not bake up correctly.

Traditionally made in molds with the classic seashell shape, there is no real limit on what kind of mold you can use as long as it’s sturdy enough not to warp while baking (you don’t want an uneven bottom). If you plan on making more than one batch at once or during different times of year (soy lecithin), consider investing in silicone baking mats instead—they’ll make cleanup easier and prevent warping when used correctly!

Subsection: 90 grams almond meal or finely ground almonds

Almonds are a good source of protein and contain monounsaturated fats, which are generally considered to be healthy. A single ounce of almonds contains about 160 calories, so make sure you don’t overdo it!

Almond meal is made from almonds that have been ground into a fine powder. It works well as an ingredient for many baked goods, including macarons.

Subsection: 175 grams icing sugar, plus extra for dusting

Icing sugar is simply ground granulated sugar. It has a finer texture than regular granulated sugar, and it’s sometimes referred to as confectioners’ or powdered sugar. It dissolves much more quickly in water than regular granulated sugar does.

Icing (or confectioners’) sugar is used in decorating sweets and pastries, as well as in making certain types of icing, such as royal icing and buttercream frostings. Icing (or confectioners’) sugar can be used in many recipes, including cookies and cakes; however, if you are using it for sweet treats with chocolate or cream fillings like macarons or éclairs then you should opt for cornstarch instead because it prevents the filling from becoming too creamy when baked at high temperatures

Subsection: 80 grams egg whites (about 2 small eggs), at room temperature and divided

  • In a small bowl, whisk together the egg whites and sugar until fully combined. Gently fold in the almond flour and cornstarch until no streaks remain.
  • Lay out parchment paper on two baking sheets and lightly grease with butter or cooking spray (I prefer to use Earth Balance). Using a piping bag fitted with a 1/2 inch tip, pipe 24 circles onto each sheet (you can also use an icing tip like I did here), spacing them at least 2 inches apart.
  • Bake for 14 minutes at 300 degrees F (150 degrees C). The shells should be set but still spring back when lightly touched—if they are not baked enough, they will be rubbery and difficult to remove from the parchment paper; if they are overbaked, the bottoms will form cracks after cooling down completely before filling them with jam or ganache! Cool completely before filling with your favorite flavor of jam or ganache! If you find that your macarons have cracked during baking or cooling just pop them into a 350 degree oven for 5 minutes then let cool completely before filling them again after removing any bits of broken shell pieces inside so nothing gets stuck inside once filled up with other toppings such as jams etc…

Subsection: 40 grams caster sugar

  • Caster sugar is a fine granulated sugar. It has a very, very fine grain and is therefore great for making meringues and macarons, but it’s not so great for making caramel or fudge, as it will not dissolve easily.
  • Caster sugar can also be known as bar sugar, baker’s sugar and confectioner’s sugar (in different countries).

Subsection: Food colouring (optional)

Food colouring is optional, but if you’re using it, you can use any colour of your choice. Food colouring comes in many different colours and flavours, and is made from natural ingredients such as vegetables and fruits.

Subsection: Method

  • In a large bowl, whisk together the almond meal, icing sugar and 60g egg whites until well combined.
  • Sift over the confectioners’ sugar and fold through using a flexible rubber spatula until no streaks remain visible on the surface of the mixture (if you don’t have a sifter, just mix thoroughly).
  • In a separate clean dry bowl, use an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment to whisk the remaining 20g egg whites until soft peaks form; fold into macaron batter in two batches until just combined (be careful not to overmix or your macarons won’t form perfect domes).

Preheat oven to 150°C. Line 2 baking trays with baking paper. Place the almond meal, icing sugar and 60g egg whites in a large bowl. Whisk with a fork until well combined. In a separate clean dry bowl, use an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment to whisk the remaining 20g egg whites until soft peaks form. Gradually add caster sugar, whisking constantly until mixture is thick and glossy. Add food colouring, if using. Continue to whisk for 1 minute or until mixture is stiff and glossy. Using a large metal spoon, gently fold one-third meringue into almond mixture until it’s just combined. Gently fold in remaining meringue in two batches, making sure mixture is just combined after each addition (don’t overmix as you want the mixture to keep its airiness).

Preheat oven to 150°C. Line 2 baking trays with baking paper. Place the almond meal, icing sugar and 60g egg whites in a large bowl. Whisk with a fork until well combined. In a separate clean dry bowl, use an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment to whisk the remaining 20g egg whites until soft peaks form. Gradually add caster sugar, whisking constantly until mixture is thick and glossy. Add food colouring, if using. Continue to whisk for 1 minute or until mixture is stiff and glossy. Using a large metal spoon, gently fold one-third meringue into almond mixture until it’s just combined. Gently fold in remaining meringue in two batches, making sure mixture is just combined after each addition (don’t overmix as you want the mixture to keep its airiness).

Make cookies: Spoon heaped tablespoons of batter onto prepared trays, leaving at least 3cm between each Macaron – they will expand during cooking! Bake for 10 minutes or until firm and pale golden around edges; don’t let them brown too much! Remove from oven; cool completely on racks while you repeat with remaining batter (you may need 2 more sheets). Once cold store cooked macarons between sheets of baking paper in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 5 days or freeze up to 3 months wrapped tightly in plastic wrap/cling film then placed inside ziplock bags before freezing

If you have time try this recipe or maybe buy then from somewhere

If you want to make your own macarons, the recipe can be found here.

If you don’t have time, or if you’d rather not spend it on making macarons, you can buy them from a bakery or a supermarket. You may also be able to find them in shops that sell French food (or other European foods).

Conclusion

If you have time try this recipe or maybe buy then from somewhere

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