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Oatmeal Cookies

Oatmeal Cookies

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Introduction

Sometimes, I forget to eat my oatmeal. Maybe I am overjoyed that I can have breakfast again. Of course it is unhealthy, having too much of a good thing isn’t healthy. But all of the things that one should stick to their diet when they are on a diet is so hard to understand for me. Sugar is my weakness and I will always get back on it when the opportunity presents itself. So these cookies, although not as quick and easy as using jarred frosting, are healthy and they taste great!

Oatmeal Cookies

  • 1 eggs
  • 1 cup oats
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 tbsp `baking soda
  • 1/2 tbsp salt
  • 1/3 cup oil
  • 1 tbsp vanilla
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • 3/4 cup packed light brown sugar

1 egg

Eggs are a great source of protein, iron and vitamin B12. They can also be a source of choline which is found in egg yolks. Choline has been shown to help with memory retention and it’s also used as a building block for neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine that affect moods and sleep patterns.

1 cup (or more) of oats

Oats are a superfood that have been known to help with digestion, heart health and even weight loss. They’re also delicious!

Oatmeal cookies are one of my favorite ways to make use of this grainy goodness. They’re easy to make, but they do require some time on your hands. I usually make two batches at once: one batch while I’m busy cooking dinner and another while I’m making lunch for the kids in their school lunches (the recipe below makes enough dough for two cookie sheets).

The best part about these oats? They’re naturally gluten-free too! But if you don’t have any allergies or sensitivities then feel free to add more flour into the mix if needed—just remember not too much though because it will create denser cookies.”

1 cup of flour

Flour is the main ingredient in all cookies, muffins and brownies. The amount of flour you use depends on how thick or thin you want your dough to be. If it’s too thick, then it won’t spread well and won’t bake evenly. If it’s too thin, then there will be little difference between one cookie and another when baked at the same time!

1 teaspoon of baking soda

Baking soda is an alkaline, a good leavener, and a good acidifier. It also helps bind together ingredients in doughs and batters so that they don’t fall apart while baking.

Baking soda can be used as an ingredient in many different recipes, including quick breads, muffins and cookies. You should always read labels carefully when buying baking soda—some brands contain other additives that you might not want to use on your food!

1/2 teaspoon of salt

  • Salt is a key ingredient for cookies. It helps to balance out the sweetness of the flour and milk, and adds flavor to your dough.
  • Salt is used in many other recipes, such as savory foods like popcorn or pasta sauces.
  • Salt may also be used to season food before cooking it—for example, when you add an inch-long piece of fresh rosemary to an onion soup recipe before simmering it on low heat until tender (you can make this step easier by placing a few drops of olive oil inside each onion).

1/3 cup of oil

Oil is a healthy, fatty substance that’s used in many baked goods. It makes the cookies crispy and helps them stay moist. This can be good or bad depending on your preferences, but it’s certainly not something you want to leave out of your recipe if you’re looking for an all-around delicious treat.

1 teaspoon of vanilla

You can use vanilla extract, vanilla beans or paste, or even the seeds from one pod.

  • 1 teaspoon of extract (or to taste)
  • 1/2 teaspoon of pods (or to taste)

You can also add one or more pods to make these cookies extra special!

3/4 cup of brown sugar (sugar) or golden syrup (syrup)

Sugar is a sweetener. Syrup is a sweetener. Brown sugar (also called molasses) is a mixture of sugar and molasses. Golden syrup (also known as evaporated cane juice) has similar properties to brown sugar but it’s made with honey instead of molasses.

Brown sugar has been around since before the Civil War, when it was considered inferior to white table sugar because it had a stronger flavor that didn’t dissolve well in water—and still does today!

3/4 cup of packed light brown sugar (sugar) or golden syrup (syrup)

Sugar is a sweetener, which means that it has the ability to replace other forms of energy in your body. It’s also a carbohydrate, which means that it can be converted into glucose for energy by the body.

Sugar is a source of vitamins and minerals such as iron, calcium and zinc. It also provides fiber in the form of oligosaccharides (oligosaccharides are complex carbohydrates). Oligosaccharides may help improve digestive health because they help slow down the release of glucose into your bloodstream after eating meals by acting like a sponge at first digestion stage

When you need to bake sweets this fall, start with these cookies. You’ll get a healthy breakfast too.

When you need to bake sweets this fall, start with these cookies. You’ll get a healthy breakfast too.

Oatmeal Cookies are a great way to start your day, or end it. The oats in these cookies make them rich and delicious—and they’re perfect for the big holiday meal later on!

Conclusion

I’m not supposed to be writing a blog post today because I’m working. But, this one is going to be short. I had to go back and check my math last night, and it turns out that my math was wrong. The cost of the ingredients for these cookies isn’t as much as I thought it was. This means that you could make about 24-36 cookies instead of 15-18 cookies with the ingredients that I listed above. That’s a lot more sweets to eat!

If you like these cookies, then you might want to check out my other recipes:

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